Leavea Legacy

Plant a tree

 

Bush 4 Baboons: Leave a positive legacy and plant a tree in our reserve for as little as $20!

Chacma baboon orphan

If you needed more reasons to plant a tree, there are SO many reasons to plant a tree.

The area where we are planting trees; within our 'rebuild area' was once used for agriculture, meaning a lot of the natural bush was once cleared.  The area, asides from a few stunning old marulas (which are protected) and some fast growing knob-thorns and sickle bush trees it is a barren area; which is the main reason we chose it to build our new facilities.  Through planting trees we can regenerate the natural environment, and already we have seen a huge increase in the population of birds which chose to nest in some of the trees.

Trees are beautiful, natural and produce oxygen for us to breathe.  Trees are a place of sanctuary, rest, shade.  Trees should never be underestimated.  Every day hundred of trees are cut down, if we plant more, we are helping the planet and the animals. 

 

Additionally, trees make delicious fruits for us and animals to eat! 

Aside from fruit for humans, trees provide food for birds and wildlife!  We really want to plant native trees and fruit producing trees to provide food for our captive animals undergoing rehabilitation, and for the wild animal visitors too.

Trees Provide Food

Planting a tree onto bare, dry earth and providing some compost and a little water to get it going begins to grow a whole new habitat; with new nutrient, water and carbon cycles.

Trees shed their leaves, provide a home for birds and animals which may offer more "compost" (if you know what we mean!), they offer shade, which in a warm environment can help micro-organisms break down the leaves and the "compost" and reduce water evapourating into the atmoshpere; the local environment suddenly becomes alive again!

Trees are Good for the Environment

Trees cool the city by up to 10 degrees F by shading homes and streets and breaking up urban “heat islands” – and by releasing water vapor into the air through their leaves.  Out in the African bush shade is much needed for animals, birds, other plants and the staff to thrive.

Trees Cool the Cities, Streets & Playing Fields

When you plant trees, you don't just make your property or your community nicer. You also directly reduce your carbon footprint. To a large extent, trees eat carbon dioxide. However, in addition to that benefit, you can also plant trees in a way to help you save energy and generate even less carbon.

Planting a Tree Reduces Your Carbon Footprint

Global warming is the result of an excess of greenhouse gases, created by burning fossil fuels and destroying tropical rainforests. Heat from the sun, reflected back from the earth, is trapped in this thickening layer of gases and global temperatures rise as a result. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a major greenhouse gas. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, removing and storing the carbon while releasing the oxygen back into the air. In one year, an acre of trees absorbs the amount of CO2 produced when you drive your car 26,000 miles.

Trees Combat the Green House Effect

We love the sound sounds of birds!  Nature's chorus is a wonderful thing to wake up to and trees will help ensure we don't miss out through providing nesting sites, food and shelter.

Trees Attract Song Birds

Everyone needs sanctuary from the South African sun, to take a nap or to hide from predators.  Birds of prey may perch to scan for food too.

Trees Provide Canopy & a Habitat for Wildlife

Planting a tree onto bare, dry earth and providing some compost and a little water to get it going begins to grow a whole new habitat; with new nutrient, water and carbon cycles.

Trees shed their leaves, provide a home for birds and animals which may offer more "compost" (if you know what we mean!), they offer shade, which in a warm environment can help micro-organisms break down the leaves and the "compost" and reduce water evaporating into the atmosphere; the local environment suddenly becomes alive again!

Trees are Beneficial to the Nutrient Cycle

Whether houses for children, creative and spiritual inspiration for adults, or a play ground for a baboon, trees have provided the space for human and animal retreat throughout the ages.

Trees are Teachers & Playmates

We rely on oxygen, as do our fellow animals and birds.  In one year an acre of trees can provide enough oxygen for eighteen people.

Trees Provide Oxygen

On hillsides, dusty areas or stream slopes, trees slow runoff and hold soil in place.  In the rebuild area the sun bakes the earth, which becomes dusty and can be blown away, or washed away when it rains.  With the tree providing shade and a mini-micro climate, it can prevent this from happening.

Trees Prevent Soil Erosion

Trees are beneficial not only for their positive health and environmental impacts; they are also BEAUTIFUL!  An area with trees is cooler, full of natures chorus and pleasing to the eye!

Trees are Beautiful

While we breathe in the fresh air, we breathe in phytoncides, airborne chemicals that plants give off to protect themselves from insects.

 

Phytoncides have antibacterial and antifungal qualities which help plants fight disease. When people breathe in these chemicals, our bodies respond by increasing the number and activity of a type of white blood cell called natural killer cells or NK. These cells kill tumour - and virus-infected cells in our bodies.

Exposure to Forests Boosts Our Immune System

Shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty lawns. Most trees need only fifteen gallons of water a week, the equivalent of two toilet flushes. What’s more, as trees transpire, they increase atmospheric moisture.

Trees Can Help to Save Water

Planting a tree onto bare, dry earth and providing some compost and a little water to get it going begins to grow a whole new habitat; with new nutrient, water and carbon cycles.

Forests and trees represent a crucial part of the water cycle. The soil absorbs precipitation that falls from the clouds, and trees draw water from the soil into their roots to support all of their life major processes such as growth, reproduction, and maintenance.  As water travels from the roots out to the leaves, water is lost through tiny pores, or stomata, in a process called transpiration. Transpiration and evaporation together comprise total evapotranspiration, the amount of water returned to the atmosphere as vapor to continue the water cycle.  Trees lower surface runoff, groundwater recharge, and water yield.   As climate change causes greater precipitation extremes and higher temperatures, trees and forests will play an increasingly vital role in the Earth's water cycle. Forests increase water quality by minimizing erosion and intercepting polluted runoff, which may become more important if climate change threatens local water supplies.

Trees Represent a Crucial Element of the Water Cycle

Trees can mask concrete walls or parking lots, and power lines and poles. They muffle sound from nearby streets and freeways, and create an eye-soothing canopy of green. Trees absorb dust and wind and reduce glare.

Trees Block Things

Numerous studies show that both exercising in forests and simply sitting looking at the trees reduce blood pressure as well as the stress-related hormones cortisol and adrenaline. Looking at pictures of trees has a similar, but less dramatic, effect.

Studies examining the same activities in urban, unplanted areas showed no reduction of stress-related effects. Using the Profile of Mood States test, researchers found that forest bathing trips significantly decreased the scores for anxiety, depression, anger, confusion and fatigue. And because stress inhibits the immune system, the stress-reduction benefits of forests are further magnified.

Trees Reduce Stress, Lower Blood Pressure & Improves Mood

 

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Address: 15 Wilger Ave, Phalaborwa, 1390, South Africa

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